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Old 10-29-2013, 11:39 AM   #1
biggunsbob   biggunsbob is offline
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Life as we Knew it

Kind of a teen book, by Susan Beth Pfeffer.

A comet hits the moon and disrupts the moons orbit, and life slowly comes to a spirals down hill on earth.. From a teenage girls prospective.. The series is already 4 books deep and over a million books sold... It is freaking me out which I know is stupid.. I feel maybe I should be more of a doomsday preppers sometimes...LOL
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Last edited by biggunsbob; 10-29-2013 at 11:40 AM.
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Old 10-29-2013, 12:01 PM   #2
KAWDUP   KAWDUP is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biggunsbob View Post
Kind of a teen book, by Susan Beth Pfeffer.

A comet hits the moon and disrupts the moons orbit, and life slowly comes to a spirals down hill on earth.. From a teenage girls prospective.. The series is already 4 books deep and over a million books sold... It is freaking me out which I know is stupid.. I feel maybe I should be more of a doomsday preppers sometimes...LOL
Thank for the recommend Bob - I have a daughter who loves that genre, and she "forces" me to read her series all the time.

Currently finishing up Mortal Instruments. Oh well - the things we do for family.
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Old 10-29-2013, 12:28 PM   #3
michchamp   michchamp is offline
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what a coincidence. I'm currently reading the book "Collapse..." by Jared Diamond. he wrote the earlier and more famous "Guns, Germs, and Steel." it's basically the same thing, but scholarly non-fiction and for grown ups. he takes a look at earlier societies that failed, (e.g. Easter Island, the Mayas) and studies the reasons why some societies/cultures disappeared completely, while others were able to survive the same sort of natural disasters.
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Old 10-29-2013, 01:55 PM   #4
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Moon is/was essential for creating tidal forces on Earth that likely has a lot to do with migrations of species and marine ecology. So I was just happening to read that there are estimated to be 17 billion Earth-sized planets orbiting within billions of solar systems within just the Milky Way galaxy, just one of an estimated 500 billion galaxies within the observable Universe.

The 17 billion of couse, does not take into account whether or not each is within the "habitable" range of its star or stars that are capable of supplying just enough light, heat, and radiation to support life as we know it. Many may have no moon orbiting them, or more than one, or is too distant (or too small) from the planet it orbits to adequately affect by gravitational pull whatever amount of saltwater seas and oceans that it may (or may not) have. The planet may have one extremely large moon and with or w/o smaller moons also in orbit. So who knows exactly what conditions must be in place, much less what axis tilt if any would be necessary for life, much less sentient life to form and proliferate/propagate. One good-sized supernova close enough to an Earthlike planet might have managed to wipe out life with gamma-ray bursts, destroying the planets' ozone layers and atmosphere, which might need a higher oxygen content at first to intially generate single celled life forms.
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Old 10-29-2013, 05:25 PM   #5
biggunsbob   biggunsbob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michchamp View Post
what a coincidence. I'm currently reading the book "Collapse..." by Jared Diamond. he wrote the earlier and more famous "Guns, Germs, and Steel." it's basically the same thing, but scholarly non-fiction and for grown ups. he takes a look at earlier societies that failed, (e.g. Easter Island, the Mayas) and studies the reasons why some societies/cultures disappeared completely, while others were able to survive the same sort of natural disasters.
I do have both of those books and someday I should read them... Thanks for the remind..
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Old 10-29-2013, 05:29 PM   #6
biggunsbob   biggunsbob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turok View Post
Moon is/was essential for creating tidal forces on Earth that likely has a lot to do with migrations of species and marine ecology. So I was just happening to read that there are estimated to be 17 billion Earth-sized planets orbiting within billions of solar systems within just the Milky Way galaxy, just one of an estimated 500 billion galaxies within the observable Universe.

The 17 billion of couse, does not take into account whether or not each is within the "habitable" range of its star or stars that are capable of supplying just enough light, heat, and radiation to support life as we know it. Many may have no moon orbiting them, or more than one, or is too distant (or too small) from the planet it orbits to adequately affect by gravitational pull whatever amount of saltwater seas and oceans that it may (or may not) have. The planet may have one extremely large moon and with or w/o smaller moons also in orbit. So who knows exactly what conditions must be in place, much less what axis tilt if any would be necessary for life, much less sentient life to form and proliferate/propagate. One good-sized supernova close enough to an Earthlike planet might have managed to wipe out life with gamma-ray bursts, destroying the planets' ozone layers and atmosphere, which might need a higher oxygen content at first to intially generate single celled life forms.

I love reading and watching about stuff like this... History channel 2 has been showing astronomy stuff all week, and the science channel is good too... Super nova 1987 was the first on that we every saw I think in the science community... Gamma-ray burst would be a super bad dad...
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